Tikorangi notes: Friday 18 February, 2011

LATEST POSTS: Friday 18 February, 2011

1) Not, apparently, Worsleya rayneri but Worsleya procera, the Empress of Brazil, in full flower as a garden plant.

2) An update on our prized resident gecko whose photograph gave rise to much interest amongst local herpetologists, we are told.

3) Garden tasks for the week with an acknowledgement that autumn is just around the corner.

4) Step by step instructions on dealing to wasp nests safely – Outdoor Classroom.

5) The ignominious end of the carefully crafted Christmas tree – now resembling a dead sheep in the wild garden.

The swimming pool garden

The swimming pool garden


TIKORANGI NOTES: Friday 18 February, 2011
Summer is a time for intensive gardening around here, though not much planting which needs to wait until autumn and winter. We have big plans for substantial new gardens where the nursery has stood in recent decades – good flat areas in full sun. However, before we embark on bringing in yet more garden area, I want to make sure that we can manage the areas we already have to the standard we want. Like most New Zealand gardens, we maintain a large area with a skeleton crew (Mark, me and our ever helpful staffer, Lloyd along with one friend of the garden). The swimming pool garden is not a prominent area and only tends to be noticed during the summer season but as I floated around in the water earlier last month, I realized I could no longer ignore it. We had tackled the massive Curculigo recurvata last winter, but the Cordyline stricta and the Ligularia reniformis were staging takeover bids. Next, it has been on to the subtropical gardens beneath our avenue of enormous rimu trees. Predominantly planted in bromeliads, this means a prickly task which more or less shredded my arms above the elbows where the protective gloves stopped, let alone the legs between ankle and knee. But the garden is looking hugely better for a major thinning effort. Gardens grow but the change can be so gradual that it can escape one’s notice just how much it has changed over time.
A pleasantly shaded garden to work in during summer

A pleasantly shaded garden to work in during summer

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