Tikorangi Notes: Friday 9 March, 2012

Latest posts:

1) Big white, scented punctuation marks through the summer woodland – Crinum moorei variegated.

2) Lobelia lore, lest you are in search of a cure for syphilis. Or maybe good summer perennials are more to your taste. I adore blue flowers.

3) Personally, I am far from a fan of the traditional cabbage but should you be more enthusiastic, Grow It Yourself looks at the genre of cabbage this week (and yes, I did mean genre, not genus).

The low tech approach to flushing the stream bed

The low tech approach to flushing the stream bed

Tikorangi Notes

We have given up waiting for the summer which is clearly never going to arrive in full strength. At least the autumn bulbs bring some seasonal cheer. The exercise of cleaning out the stream continues in a very low tech manner. Mark has lifted the water level and channels it through a small opening in a purpose built corrugated iron barrier. The current generated is sufficient to flush the mud downstream as long as he stirs it up with the rake, to get the mud particles back in suspension mode. How far he can get it cleaned by this method remains to be seen – the ponds will represent a challenge to span with the barrier. A pontoon, he says he needs. I just can not quite visualise how he will manage a pontoon but all this saves the exercise of having to hire a sludge pump.

The disappointment this week is our yew tree which is looking alarmingly as if it is in decline. Fungal root disease is the verdict – a casualty of an unusually wet summer. As it is about 60 years old and a shapely, clipped feature defying the laws of gravity to lean on an angle, we would be sorry to lose it. We don’t spray much at all these days, but this tree warrants a dose of heavy duty fungicide to see if we can halt its rapid decline.

Felix the Kiwi, our clipped yew, may be succumbing

Felix the Kiwi, our clipped yew, may be succumbing

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