Gone by lunchtime.

There has only ever been one significant flowering

Sometimes a tree just has to go. This flowering cherry has been sitting under a death sentence for several years. Mark planted it maybe 25 years ago and while it was quite a good shape, it rarely flowered and just grew larger, casting shade over other plants that were working harder for their continued existence. It will have been a named variety but we have long since lost the name.

“I am going to cut that cherry out,” said Mark about four years ago. It was as if the tree heard him and it confounded us by suddenly producing its best ever display of 2015. But 2016 and 2017 came and it was resting on its laurels of one decent enough performance, returning to its usual pattern of just a few scattered blooms.

One of the most useful skills Mark learned in his twenties was how to use a chainsaw safely. Possibly even more importantly, he learned the limits of his skills with the chainsaw and when it is necessary to pay for outside specialists to come in and handle a tricky situation. This tree represented no such problem. He dropped it efficiently and our Lloyd moved in to do the clean-up. Any branches too thick to be fed through the mulcher were sawn into short lengths and moved to the firewood shed. We get through prodigious amounts of firewood in winter, all of it harvested off the property. The leafage and small branches were mulched on the spot.

It was, as we say in New Zealand parlance, gone by lunchtime. Literally so, in this case.

I am not sure how people manage big gardens when they can’t do their own basic chainsaw work and manage the clean-up. Expensively, I guess.

Pretty enough flowers. Once. In 2015.

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10 thoughts on “Gone by lunchtime.

  1. Carol Hickey

    Sad, but sometimes it has to be done. In the aftermath, it’s always exciting to see what was an understorey change and thrive, and sometimes you get a new view from your windows! The firewood and mulch will be useful.

    Reply
  2. Maureen Forsyth

    Lovely shape – must leave quite a gap – I so wanted to read on and see what was going to replace it. M.

    On 1 February 2018 at 06:42, Tikorangi The Jury Garden wrote:

    > Abbie Jury posted: ” Sometimes a tree just has to go. This flowering > cherry has been sitting under a death sentence for several years. Mark > planted it maybe 25 years ago and while it was quite a good shape, it > rarely flowered and just grew larger, casting shade over other” >

    Reply
    1. Abbie Jury Post author

      Not sure that we will put anything back in that place. There are some very good varieties of rhododendrons that have struggled in the increasing. We may just wait and see if they recover in the light.

      Reply
    1. Abbie Jury Post author

      Not sure that a mere one generation 25 year old tree rates as venerable or old but we are in the position of being guardians of trees that were planted back in 1870 and a remnant of the original tawa forest here.

      Reply
    2. janesmudgeegarden

      The oldest tree in my garden is about 6 years old! I would love to see photos of the tawa forest and the 1870 trees. I had to look at a map to see where Tikorangi is, even though I was born in NZ (Wellington). A few years ago we travelled the Forgotten Highway near you, and thouroughly enjoyed the trip. You live in a beautiful part of the world.

      Reply
      1. janesmudgeegarden

        I have just seen the photos in the information about the garden and am quite lost for words.It is a truly splendid place and those are indeed venerable trees.

  3. tonytomeo

    How sad; but I get it. I will be cutting down some birches soon because they are so crowded now that the trees they grew up with are grown up. There also happens to be a flowering cherry that already bloomed only to get the bloom knocked off by the rain. (We have not gotten any rain since then.) This happens every year. There is no point in maintaining a tree that does not perform.

    Reply
  4. Tim Dutton

    I well remember the venerable trees at Tikorangi on our one and only visit when you had the garden open to the public. If a huge tree needs to go for any reason it is certainly a job for the professionals. We have literally dozens of trees in our property that are over 30 metres tall and there are very few of them that I would try to cut down myself, almost all inherited when we bought the place 24 years ago. We recently had to remove 6 old Douglas firs along our boundary after one had snapped in half in a storm and landed in the next door garden. With nowhere at all to fell the trees it took the pros 3 days to take them all out in sections and, yes, it was expensive, but they did it without any damage to people or the numerous nearby plantings. We now have a mountain of mulch that we can use once it has had time to decompose a bit. Lovely smell :-)

    Reply

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