Tag Archives: Lanarth

Tikorangi notes: August 13, 2010

Magnolia Lanarth

Magnolia Lanarth

LATEST POSTS:

1) The wonder of Magnolia Lanarth in flower.
2) Hints for tasks in the garden this week as we race headlong into spring.
3) Beware the bangalow palm – our deep reservations about the weed potential of Archontophoenix cunninghamiana (Abbie’s column).
4) Tried and True for autumn colour where space allows – tree dahlias.
5) Counting down to our annual Taranaki Rhododendron and Garden Festival.

Magnolia campbellii in full flower this week

Magnolia campbellii in full flower this week

TIKORANGI NOTE:
Magnolia time here is our absolutely favourite time of year. At this stage, the spectacular performers are M. campbellii and Magnolia Lanarth, with Vulcan just starting and some of Mark’s unnamed seedlings putting on an early show. With the dwarf narcissi also at their peak (the snowdrops are largely over), there is something particularly delightful about the big and small pictures running simultaneously. The big-leafed rhododendrons in our park are opening, the earliest michelias are flowering and our garden visitor season started this week with an early visit from a local garden club. The pressure is on to get the garden groomed up and the planting out up to date. The pressure of spring is upon us.

Magnolia Diary number 2, 11 August 2009

Click to see all Magnolia diary entries

Click on the Magnolia diary logo above to see all diary entries

Leonard Messel, just opening

Leonard Messel, just opening

Our magic early spring weather continues (and believe me, we never take the absence of both wind and rain for granted here) and more magnolias open every day. Leonard Messel is showing his first flowers. Leonard is sold as a small growing magnolia in this country, to be planted perhaps where something shrubby rather than a tree is required. So we were amused to pace out our plant which is only about 20 years old at the most and to find that its footprint is not a lot smaller than many of our substantial magnolia trees. It is just shorter in stature so it looks smaller but it still measures nigh on nine metres across. Leonard Messel looks splendid on its day when in full flower, but the petals and form lack much substance and in a windy climate such soft characteristics mean it can start to look rather raggy.

One of the early flowering Snow Flurry series

One of the early flowering Snow Flurry series

Michelias have been the subject of an intensive breeding programme here for some time now and the early whites are all coming into flower. Botanically michelias have been reclassified as magnolias, but we admit that for clarity and understanding, we lean towards calling them michelias in conversation. We refer to these early whites as the Snow Flurry series and while we can not post a photo of the one we have selected for probable release, we have shelter belts full of the also rans, or rejects. Indeed we have so many that Mark now calls them his sustainable woodlot as he chainsaws off branches to feed our small (very small in number but increasingly large of size) herd of beef cattle to get them through the shortage of late winter feed. Coppiced michelias – these may be a first.

Mark's sustainable woodlot of reject michelia seedlings

Mark's sustainable woodlot of reject michelia seedlings

Besides Lanarth and campbellii, it is the also rans in the deciduous magnolias which are the most spectacular today. Too good to chainsaw out but not quite good enough to put into commercial release, we have a run of what Mark calls his instant campbelliis flowering around the boundaries. Instant because they flower on very young plants (it can take many years for campbellii itself to flower), but this strain of magnolias bloom too early in the season and the trees grow too fast and too large for modern gardens. It is likely that they will remain forever in our shelter belts and on our boundaries where they can look splendid for us.

Rejected campbellii type hybrids

Rejected campbellii type hybrids